Apparel

Three questions with Kim Shui

The designer who kickstarted her NYFW show with NFT keys talks about her always-online customer and the future of her brand.
article cover

David Gannon

· less than 3 min read

Stay up to date on the retail industry

All the news and insights retail pros need to know, all in one newsletter. Join over 180,000 retail professionals by subscribing today.

Joining established names like Tom Ford and Carolina Herrera at New York Fashion Week was Kim Shui, a relatively new entrant to the fashion week circuit, who staged her first runway show in 2018.

This year, the New York-based womenswear designer known for her vibrant prints returned with a grand presentation at the Grand Central Terminal. The brand also launched limited edition NFT keys leading up to the show that unlocked a custom-designed hoodie or tickets to her NYFW runway show. Shui said the presentation was “successful.” The “key” in question retailed for $100, and acted as a digital NYFW collectible that consumers could own as a keepsake on the blockchain.

Retail Brew caught up with the up-and-coming designer after her show to ask her three pressing questions:

How do you define the Kim Shui customer?

They’re 21 to 40. They live in a major city, or they're in a smaller city and really up to date on fashion on social media. They're very big users of TikTok and Instagram and kind of are influenced by seeing what other people are also wearing online. And they are not afraid of being bold with their fashion choices.

Why did NFT keys make sense for your brand?

It made a lot of sense on so many different levels. I know that our NFT keys did really well. People were so excited about it. I think it's a great way to really encourage active community participation, and to really strengthen a community. I would love to see that happen more.

What’s next for Kim Shui?

We kind of want to experiment with some different ways of retail. I really want to explore how we can create more drops. We have traditionally done shows every two seasons. I'm kind of interested in also doing smaller collections and dropping that throughout the year, with a see-now-buy-now element to it, and also having Afterpay being able to have people access that. I think the idea of drops, the quantities being of a certain amount and having designs where they can be more thought-out, that also is interesting to me—JS

Stay up to date on the retail industry

All the news and insights retail pros need to know, all in one newsletter. Join over 180,000 retail professionals by subscribing today.